Cinema Style Ep. 4

Hello and welcome to another episode of Cinema Style, but this time, it’s the ~Christmas Edition~.

For the month of December, I’ll be posting a few special festive editions of Cinema Style, exploring all things fur-trimmed and turtlenecked.

I figured we should start with a classic, and what could be more classic than White Christmas? (The film, not the Black Mirror episode.)

Now, the film itself is… questionable at times, from the occasionally stiff performances to the rah-rah-WWII numbers. Like any good Christmas flick, there’s a healthy dose of camp served with a side of cheese. But what really sticks in my mind about White Christmas, and what we’re going to discuss today, is the incredible Christmas costuming.

Released in 1954, White Christmas stars Bing Crosby (the King of Christmas) and Danny Kaye as performing friends who join up with a sister act (Rosemary Clooney and Vera Ellen) to perform at a failing country inn in rural Vermont, which is owned by their former commander in WWII. Hijinks and extravagant musical numbers ensue.

The film received a mixed bag of reviews from critics, but was a hit with audiences. It was, by a wide margin, the top-grossing film of the year. The film was especially notable for being the first filmed in VistaVision, a new technology from Paramount that enabled them to shoot a wider surface area than 35mm. Think of what a big deal it was when we first began releasing features films in 3D.

Now, the costuming in the film was done by the incomparable Edith Head, who I have mentioned in this blog before, specifically in the piece on Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

I’m not going to spend this entire post waxing poetic about Edith Head but just know: she’s a genius, she’s iconic and when I grow up I want to be her.

With Head on the team, it’s a guarantee we’ll have some incredible costuming moments, especially with the sisters Betty and Judy.

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Vera Ellen as Judy Haynes (left) and Rosemary Clooney as Betty Haynes. Image Source.

Whether it’s their “everyday” clothes or their stage outfits, Betty and Judy deliver look after look throughout the film.

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Betty (L) and Judy performing “Sisters” . Image Source.

Of course, the musical performances allow for all the best high-drama costuming moments. I’m talking specifically about that black dress Rosemary Clooney wears in the “Love, You Didn’t Do Me Right” performance.

The neckline. The fit. The rhinestone-encrusted gloves. The pink curtain. The drama.

Not to mention it’s super effective, when you’re performing a passionate, sorrowful song about a broken heart, to have men dressed in all black dance slowly around you. I’ve yet to try it myself but I’m sure it’s foolproof.

This particular dress also marks a turn for Betty in the film. Prior to this moment, she is the more modestly dressed compared to her outgoing sister, who is always sporting tight-fitting brightly-coloured clothing. However, as Betty emerges as Bob’s love interest and a diva in her own right, her wardrobe begins to reflect that. This can be considered a signature of Head’s skills – the emotional arc of characters being reflected in their wardrobe. (Though, Judy doesn’t really go through the character development Betty does, but she does come into herself.)

Certainly, Judy’s performances give some memorable wardrobe moments, including the Mistral Number scene, where Judy’s dance skills are showcased as much as her ridiculously beautiful legs.

Bob and Phil (Crosby and Kaye, respectively) are onstage in this sequence too, rocking some classic top hats and coattails.

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Phil, Judy and Bob. Image Source.

In the nature of full disclosure, the colouring of this scene actually makes me slightly uncomfortable, but that’s Technicolor for ya.

But of course, the most iconic scene and costumes come from the final musical number, where all four characters don variations of a Santa Claus-esque look.

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Image via Pinterest.

That red satin and white trim makes for a fairly literal interpretation of Christmas, but is also a classic for a reason. This is my ideal Christmas season aesthetic, and obviously is applicable to everyday life. 10/10 would wear this to the mall.

White Christmas is many things: a big-budget musical, a holiday classic, a campy, cheesy romp and a whirlwind of technicolored finery. For me, it’s full of lush, dreamy costumes that provide endless inspiration for this time of year. Also, it’s pretty great to have on in the background when wrapping presents.

Sources

IMDb

Wikipedia

Screen Prism

Cinema Style Ep. 1

I’ve wanted to do something with cinema on here for a while. If you don’t already know, I studied film in university – in fact, it was my minor. I love the movies, and every aspect of filmmaking is interesting to me. But this is a fashion blog, not a movie blog, so I didn’t want to get too heavy into film theory, technology or business. What’s the best way to marry these two interests of mine?

Costuming, naturally.

I had the idea to start creating occasional posts about the fashion in movies, from my personal favourites to the most iconic costumes of all time. If this sounds appealing to anyone following the blog, let me know. I’m really excited to do these!

I will still be doing outfit posts, but if I decide to continue with these Cinema Style articles, they will be coming every few weeks.

Without further ado, I bring you the first episode! And what better way to open up the series than with one of my favourite movies.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Released in 1961, Breakfast at Tiffany’s was directed by Blake Edwards and based on the book by Truman Capote. The movies starts Audrey Hepburn as the flighty, larger-than-life Holly Golightly, a socialite looking to date the richest men she can find. George Peppard plays Paul Varjack, a writer who moves into Holly’s building. Shenanigans ensue, truths are revealed, declarations are made.

Let me be clear: this, like many others, is not a movie without faults. Mickey Rooney’s performance as Mr. Yunioshi is, in a word, problematic.

But, when I was younger, this was my ultimate favourite movie. I had a huge crush on George Peppard and was deeply dismayed to discover this movie had been made 50 years ago and Peppard had died in 1994. Why did I have such a crush on him? He was handsome, he was a writer, and he wore the most beautiful suits.

As you can see, I’ve always had my priorities straight.

The costuming in this film is a time capsule of 1960s style with fabulous party wear for Holly. We’re talking dramatic hats, prints and a good pair on sunnies.

Of course, we’re also talking that black dress from the opening scene. With a dress that classically beautiful, it comes as little surprise that the principal costume designer for Hepburn was Mr. Hubert de Givenchy himself.

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Photo via Pinterest

You’ve probably heard of Givenchy the brand before.

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Hepburn being dressed by Givenchy in 1959. Photo Source.

The man Givenchy founded the fashion house in 1952, and since then it has been a stable in the French couture scene. Among his achievements, Givenchy is credited with creating the balloon coat and the baby doll dress. Hepburn was one of his regular clients and a friend.

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Photo via Pinterest

Even if you’ve never seen the film, you could probably call up that famous opening image of Hepburn munching on a danish outside of Tiffany’s in that black dress with the pearls and sunglasses. When I first saw that scene, I wanted to be her, standing on that corner in New York, wearing that dress. I could never be her, though, and one of the (many) reasons for that is Givenchy designed the dress especially for Hepburn. She was able to keep it after filming  and the dress eventually sold at Christie’s for $900,000 in 2006.

Another notable Givenchy piece is the bright orange peacoat seen on Holly when she and Paul are galavanting around New York City. The double-breasted coat was widely copied following the release of the film. Orange can be a tricky colour, but of course Hepburn pulls it off so well. (And it looks good in Technicolor.)

Aside from the gorgeous Givenchy pieces, recognition needs to be given to costume supervisor Edith Head, and if you haven’t heard of her yet, you’re about to.

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Edith Head and her Oscars. Photo Source.

Over her decades-long career, Head won a record eight Academy Awards in costume design for her work on The Heiress, Samson and Delilah, All About Eve, A Place in the Sun, Roman Holiday, Sabrina (where Givenchy also provided designs), The Facts of Life and The Sting. 

The Academy Awards didn’t even have an award for costume designing until 1948, which was when Head really started to garner attention for her work. She had an incredible career and worked with some of the most notable actresses in Hollywood.

Head was responsible for Holly’s other iconic looks in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. 

The men’s shirt Holly wore to bed was designed by Head, and paired with that turquoise sleep mask and bright ear plugs, it is to this day the best sleepwear look I’ve ever seen.

Head was also responsible for the sweater, jeans and towel ensemble sported by Holly in the “Moon River” scene.

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Gif via Tumblr

Paul’s (and the audience’s) glimpse to the true Holly is masterfully indicated with this toned-down look. It is, after all, very easy to look glamorous when one is always wearing classic Givenchy.

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Holly in more Givenchy. Photo Source.

Through Givenchy and Head, we see the duality of Holly’s character come to life: the glamorous partier and the layered, emotional young woman from the country. These identities both exist in Holly, as they do in many women, though often not to the same extremes. There is the face you show to the world, and the one you keep more private.

This is one of the reasons I like fashion so much. It is a way to demonstrate our inner characteristics to the outside world – a way of introducing ourselves without having to say a word. Any good costume designer should be able to do just that for their characters, and Head and Givenchy pull it off masterfully.

Sources

IMDb

Vogue

Hubert de Givenchy Bio

Edith Head Bio

 

 

Get Hallo-weird

There’s nothing wrong with getting a little weird, a little freaky.

And there’s no better time to do so than Halloween.

The entire month of October is reserved for the creepy and mysterious, the strange and inexplicable. The sky is grey and the wind picks up. Leaves crunch under your feet and perform a ghostly tango in front of your very eyes.  It is, to me, one of the best times of the year, after Christmas naturally.

(Though, I am of the opinion that September-December are the best months.)

I like creepy things, to an extent. I like getting scared and uncovering mysteries and eating enough mini boxes of Smarties that I feel close to exploding. I love Halloween a whole lot, and this year, like every past year, I wanted to make sure I marked the holiday with as much enthusiasm and merry-making as I could.

With this in mind, I went to Ottawa.

I could’ve stayed here in Toronto, but I got this idea in mind where I wanted to visit friends from university. So I packed a bag, hopped on a train and crashed with my friend Selena. She has a very comfortable couch.

Because I was only there for the weekend, I didn’t get to see too much of the uni crowd, but I got to dress up, go out and get a little weird, and those are usually the main H-wizzle goals.

The thing is, I had no ideas for a costume. I’m horribly uncreative when it comes to Halloween costumes, and I needed something ASAP that wasn’t going to be too expensive or you know, a bright yellow tube dress that passes for a Minion costume. (Things I actually saw in the shops.)

I decided to work with what I had, and what I had was witch-y.

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Enjoy my costume in high-contrast glory because I thought it was a great idea to use the flash.

Once I got the witch idea in my head, it was easy. A black dress with wide sleeves from Urban Outfitters I already had. A couple of chunky silver rings. A dark lipstick.

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All I needed was a hat, and I ended up getting one last minute from Shopper’s Drug Mart. I’m sure Jessica Lange wouldn’t have approved the cheapness of it all, but maybe would have allowed the sentiment behind it.

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All in all, it was easy to put a costume together. It wasn’t the most brilliant, but it was fun, I loved it. And anyway, dressing up as a witch was pretty on-brand for me.

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Now Selena got a bit creative. A couple of days before I visited, she texted me costume ideas based on food puns, such as “a grape time” and “a rice guy.” Aside form making me snort out Pumpkin Spice Latte, these ideas serve a higher purpose, as Selena ended up going with the particularly well-thought-out “bitch peas.”

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The best moment was having drunk people guess what it was, and then their faces when they realized. Endless entertainment for the evening.

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General tom-foolery that was too good not to share.

So we did the monster mash. And laughed, and talked. I tried to do the Thriller dance in Selena’s kitchen when I realized I actually had no idea how the dance goes. Alas, I think I failed my parents in that moment.

The next day saw a Halloween-sized hangover, a gleeful viewing of The Nightmare Before Christmas, and a quiet night in with Frankenstein and candy.

And tonight, on the actual All Hallow’s Eve, of all things I have to work. Until 9 p.m. So no trick or treater’s here, except for me with more fun-sized candy, probably, and Halloweentowns 1-4. Does that sound a bit sad? I don’t think so. I had my partying time, but now it’s Monday, I have work and apparently I’m getting old because I’m still a bit tired.

Whatever plans you have, whether you’re with me under a pile of blankets or venturing out into the wild night, play it safe, play it cool and don’t be afraid to get a little weird.

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